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Positioning Slide Text on a Full-Width Divi Slider | Divi Booster

Note: I’m still developing this tip, so it hasn’t been tested extensively and isn’t yet available as an option in Divi Booster.Here’s a quick tip for positioning the slide text on individual slides with the Divi Theme‘s full width slider.Suppose you start with a full-width slider with a background image and some text, similar to that shown in the featured image above. Divi has an option in the slide settings to toggle the vertical alignment between centered and bottom-aligned. However, if you want more control over the text position, you will need to resort to CSS.For example to align the slider text to the top right corner of the slide, we can add the following into the slide’s custom CSS field for the slide description:Here’s the copy-and-pasteable version:
text-align: right; padding-top: 5% !important; padding-bottom: 27% !important;
Source: Positioning Slide Text on a Full-Width Divi Slider | Divi Booster

How To Make Accordion Module Tabs Closable And Change Icon On WordPress Using The Divi Theme – Success with WordPress 101

By default, the tabs of the Accordion Module in Divi cannot be closed. The opened tab can only be closed when clicking on another accordion tab. Today, we will be focusing on how to close an open accordion tab without having to press another, and also to have a “close” icon that you can click!

This tutorial will only require you to copy and paste a simple jQuery/Javascript code and a CSS Code. Don’t you worry if you’re not familiar with this, with this tutorial I’ve made, it’s pretty simple to follow.

Source: How To Make Accordion Module Tabs Closable And Change Icon On WordPress Using The Divi Theme – Success with WordPress 101

CSS « WordPress Codex

WordPress relies heavily on the presentation styles within CSS. With the use of Themes, you have an almost infinite choice of layout options. WordPress Themes make it easy to change your website’s appearance, and open up the field to help you create your own Theme and page layout.

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets. It allows you to store style presentation information (like colors and layout) separate from your HTML structure. This allows precision control of your website layout and makes your pages faster and easier to update.

This article briefly describes the use of CSS in WordPress, and lists some references for further information. For information on CSS itself, see Know Your Sources#CSS.

Contents

1 WordPress and CSS

2 Custom CSS in WordPress

2.1 Why use Custom CSS?

3 WordPress Generated Classes

4 Templates and CSS

5 WordPress Layout Help

6 CSS Resources

WordPress and CSS

WordPress Themes use a combination of template files, template tags, and CSS files to generate your WordPress site’s look.

Source: CSS « WordPress Codex

Hide the Divi Theme Header | Divi Booster

/* Hide the header */
#main-header { display:none; }
#page-container { 
	padding-top:0px !important; 
	margin-top:-1px !important 
}

/* Adjust padding for transparent headers */
.et_transparent_nav #main-content .container {
    padding-top: 58px !important;
}

To remove the header from a single page (or post), you can paste the code given at the start of the post into per-page “Custom CSS” box, which you’ll find as follows:

Visual Builder – Click on the purple “…” menu button, then on the purple “cog” icon and navigate to “Advanced > Custom CSS” in the Page Settings box that appears.

Backend Builder – Click on the purple “cog” icon and navigate to “Advanced > Custom CSS” in the Page Settings box that appears.

Classic Editor – On the page edit screen, click on the three-lined “hamburger” menu button on the top right of the purple Divi Builder area. Place CSS into the Custom CSS box in the menu that appears.

CSS placed in these boxes will apply only to that particular page.

Source: Hide the Divi Theme Header | Divi Booster

PressForward Plugin

Frequently Asked Questions

PressForward is a free plugin that provides an editorial workflow for content aggregation and curation within the WordPress Dashboard. It is designed for bloggers and editorial teams who wish to collect, discuss, and share content from a variety of sources on the open web.

PressForward uses RSS and Atom feeds, and a bookmarklet, to aggregate content and then allows you to read, discuss, select, and republish items on your own WordPress site.

Here’s a list of frequently asked questions about the plugin:

Will PressForward aggregate all types of content?

Who can see my feed subscriptions?

Can I choose what to publish?

How does PressForward compare to other plugins?

Will PressForward work with my theme?

Can I change the way the item looks on my site?

Am I allowed to republish content created by other people?

How can I attribute content to the original author and source?

Can you point me to some publications that use PressForward?

Will PressForward work on a multisite or network site?

How often does PressForward refresh and check for more sources?

Why isn’t my site retrieving content from a feed?

Why do I see short excerpts from some articles and the full content of others?

Where can I find more extensive documentation?

Who built PressForward?

I’ve got a question not listed here. How can I get an answer?

Source: CoActive Blog – What I’ve been working on.

How to Block Cookies on a WordPress Website

How to Block Cookies on a WordPress Website

Author

Tom Rankin

Filed Under

Development, Tools

Published

September 10, 2019

No Comments

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‘Cookies’ are small bits of data that enable user-specific features, but they have also become a source of privacy concerns and security risks. This is why the so-called ‘Cookie Law’ was put in place. In a nutshell, this requires user consent to be collected before using them. To meet this requirement, you’ll need a way to both block cookies and collect consent.

One of the easiest ways to do this on your WordPress website is (of course) by using plugins. There are a number of plugins available to help you stay on the right side of the Cookie Law in WordPress.

In this article, we will firstly discuss the Cookie Law in more detail, then we’ll look at whether or not WordPress sites use cookies. Finally, we’ll round up some solutions and discuss how you can set up a cookie consent notification on your website. Let’s get to it!

Source: How to Block Cookies on a WordPress Website

Custom Google Analytics Dashboards – Why and How to Create Them

In case you haven’t noticed it yet, here at TorqueMag we are a little obsessed with web analytics. You can see it from articles like these:

Why do we stress this point to so much? Because knowing what is going on with your site traffic is the first step in optimizing your web presence for it. Or as Sherlock Holmes puts it:

It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.

In other words, having access to and analyzing your data is an essential part of making informed decisions about your site.

In this post, we want to talk about a tool that helps you cut through the noise and focus on the data that really matters: custom Google Analytics dashboards.

If you want to know what they are, why you should use them and most importantly, how to implement custom dashboards in Google Analytics, just keep reading.

What are Google Analytics Dashboards?

We can’t possibly discuss how to customize dashboards until we cover what they are in the first place. Here’s how Google defines them:

Dashboards are a collection of widgets that give you an overview of the reports and metrics you care about most. Dashboards let you monitor many metrics at once, so you can quickly check the health of your accounts or see correlations between different reports.

In short, your dashboards give you an overview of your website data.

Source: Custom Google Analytics Dashboards – Why and How to Create Them

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Thinking about an online Hosting your Wordpress

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.